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Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-19
Downloads: 196

EVALUATION OF ALTITUDE EFFECTS ON THE SPATIAL STRUCTURE OF CAUCASIAN OAK (QUERCUS MACRANTHERA) STANDS IN ARASBARAN PROTECTED FORESTS, NORTHWEST OF IRAN

Milad Safari (1)*, Kiomars Sefidi (2), Ahmad Alijanpour (3),
and Mohammad Razi Elahian (4)

1. Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran.
*E-mail: safarimilad72@gmail.com
2. Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran.
3. Faculty of Natural Resources, University of Urmia, Iran.
4. Department of Natural Resources, East Azarbaijan Province, Iran.

Abstract:

This study investigated the relationships between physiographical factors and trees structural
characteristics in Arasbaran forest, northwest of Iran. Systematic randomized sampling method
was used to collect data and in sample plot used the distance method for determination of spatial
distribution pattern. Results of spatial distribution pattern indices showed the clumped spatial distribution
for Caucasian oak trees (Quercus macranthera Fisch. & C.A.Mey. ex Hohen). In addition,
the altitude affected the tree’s characteristics significantly. The greatest tree’s diameter at breast
height was found in R3 and density of trees was decreased by increasing of altitude. Distance to
neighbour index showed four to six meter distances between trees. DBH and height differentiation
indices demonstrated uniformity in trees. Landform indices had the greatest average on R3 and
had a significant correlation with trees density and crown area. It could be concluded that the
difference in physiographical condition is one of the main factors of the tree’s spatial distribution
and forest structure variation at physiographical units in this study area.

(Forestry Ideas, 2019, Vol. 25, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 118

SATELLITE MAPPING OF BULGARIAN LAND COVER – CORINE 2018 PROJECT

Ventzeslav Dimitrov (1), Radka Koleva (2)*, Youlin Tepeliev (2), Yulia Kroumova (3),
Todor Lubenov (1), and Nadezhda Ilieva (3)

1. Space Research and Technology Institute – BAS, Acad. G. Bonchev Str. Block 3, 1113 Sofia,
Bulgaria.
2. University of Forestry, 10 Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1797 Sofia, Bulgaria.
*E-mails: rad_koleva@abv.bg, rad.koleva@gmail.com
3. National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography – BAS, Acad. G. Bonchev Str.
Block 3, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria.

Abstract:

The main aim of the CORINE Land cover 2018 project is to identify and map the changes of
land cover/land use for the period 2012–2018 using multitemporal/multispectral satellite imagery.
Harmonized methodology with a 44 class nomenclature and a computer assisted photo-interpretation
are applied for creating a geospatial database of Bulgarian territory for the year 2018. A brief
description of the applied methodology and the main results achieved are presented. The whole
Bulgarian territory is mapped in details adequate for the 1:100 000 scale with a minimum mapping
unit of 25 ha and a minimum change area of 5 ha. A statistical analysis of the created databases
is made. For the investigated period (2012–2018) the largest in number (2720), the largest as
area (53,558 ha) and with the highest percentage (53.54 %) of the total area of the changes are
the changes occurring in class 3 ‘Forests and semi-natural areas’. Six types of changes prevail,
forming over 3/4 of the area of all changes – loss of coniferous forests (23,392 ha – 23 %), loss
of broad-leaved forests (18,389 ha – 18 %), pastures into non-irrigated arable land (14,534 ha –
14 %), vineyards into non-irrigated arable land (9451 ha – 9 %), fruit trees and berry plantations
into non-irrigated arable land (6051 ha – 6 %) and restored broad-leaved forests (4865 ha – 5 %).
The area of recovered broad-leaved forests (change 324-311) is 4865 ha, which is almost 4 times
less than the lost (18,389 ha). Two negative change processes were identified – conversion of
vineyards (221) and orchards (222) into non-irrigated arable land (211), i.e. extensification of
agriculture, but also was an intensification one – change of pastures (231) to non-irrigated arable
land (211).

(Forestry Ideas, 2019, Vol. 25, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 116

BIOGEOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN FOREST ECOSYSTEMS POLLUTED BY INDUSTRIAL
EMISSIONS, EAST SIBERIA, RUSSIA

Tatiana A. Mikhailova, Olga V. Shergina*, and Olga V. Kalugina

Siberian Institute of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian
Academy of Sciences, 664033 Irkutsk, 132 Lermontova Str., Russia.
*E-mail: sherolga80@mail.ru

Abstract:

The biogeochemical data of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests have been studied in the impact
and buffer zones of the influence of technogenic emissions from the large industrial center
Usolie-Sibirskoe (East Siberia, Russia). Changes in the acid-base balance, accumulation and
migration of elements-pollutants, the content of nutrient elements in the components of forest
ecosystem – tree-stands, forest litter, soil horizons – on contaminated areas compared to the
background sample plot have been revealed. A significant shift in the acid-base balance to the
alkaline range and an active migration of elements-pollutants in soil horizons and forest litter have
been shown to be key processes causing a disturbance of exchange reactions of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+,
Na+ cations in the soil absorbing complex (SAC) and a decrease in nutrient elements migration
into root systems of trees. Pronounced changes in the acid-base balance, high accumulation of
elements-pollutants, binding of nutrient elements by pollutants in the soil horizons and in plant
tissues lead to the disruption of nutrition and to the inhibition of pine trees growth processes. The
biogeochemical parameters observed are characterized by interconnected changes in the main
components of the forest ecosystem (soil and tree-stand) and can serve as adequate criteria for
assessing its state under technogenic pollution.

   

(Forestry Ideas, 2019, Vol. 25, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 132

CONTENT AND STOCK OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOILS ON THE TERRITORY OF VITOSHA NATURE PARK

Ludmila Malinova (1)*, Pavel Pavlov (1), and Biser Hristov (2)

1. University of Forestry, 10 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1797, Bulgaria.
*E-mail: ludmila_malinova@yahoo.com
2. N. Poushkarov Institute of Soil Science, Agrotechnologies and Plant Protection, Sofia 1331,
7 Shosse Bankya Str.

Abstract:

A complex of humus parameters was studied and a database was created about the content
of soil organic matter and org. C stock in the surface 20 cm layer of Umbrisols in order to monitor
the relationship ‘climate changes – organic C stock’ over time. Geo-coordinated stations located
near the Cherni Vrah meteorological station were used, where the temperatures and precipitation
have been observed since 1935. Higher acidity (рНН2О), higher amount of total carbon and free
low-molecular humic acids were determined in the surface 10 cm soil layer in comparison with
the 10–20 cm layer. The share of humic and fulvic acids in the total carbon of the two layers did
not differ and was characterized by stable values. The org. C stock in the surface 10 cm layer was
7.00 ±1.31 t.ha-1 and 15.55 ±2.72 t.ha-1 in the 10–20 cm layer. The total org. C stock in the surface
20 cm layer of Umbrisols was 18594.15 t. The obtained results allow future statistical evaluations
of information about monitoring the relationship ‘climate changes – org. C stock’ over time.

(Forestry Ideas, 2019, Vol. 25, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 113

EFFECT OF INTENSIVE REARING ON FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY: A CASE STUDY WITH THE ROCK PARTRIDGE (ALECTORIS GRAECA GRAECA)

Paolo Viola (1), Riccardo Primi (1), Federica Gabbianelli (2), Pier Paolo Danieli (1),
Livia Lucentini (3), and Andrea Amici (1)*

1. Department of Agriculture and Forest Science, DAFNE. University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy.
*E-mail: amici@unitus.it
2. Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems, DIBAF, University
of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy.
3. Department of Biotechnology, University of Perugia, Italy.

Abstract:

Rock partridge (Alectoris graeca) is included in Annex I of the EU Birds Directive as Species
of Conservation Concern (SPEC 1), because of the continuing decline in the area of occupancy.
In this context, ex situ conservation programs and production systems of captive Rock partridges
suited to the wild are necessary to ensure that insurance, reintroduction or restocking goals are
met. Anyway, morphological changes occurring in captive-reared animals indicate the loss of
animal’s ability to survive in natural environment. In this study, we used the offspring of wild Apennine
rock partridges (Alectoris graeca graeca). The young birds were divided into two groups,
the first (G1) was housed in enriched and wild-like environment, the second (G2) was subjected
to intensive-rearing conditions. Starting at 14 days post-hatching (DPH) and continuing up to 98
DPH, body mass (BM), tarsus length (TL), tarsus depth (TD), tarsus width (TW), head width (HW),
head length (HL), wing length (WL) and beak length (BL), were measured fortnightly. Birds in G1
showed shorter heads (F = 10.50, p = 0.000) and thinner tarsi (F = 9.80, p = 0.000) at 84 DPH. At
98 DPH also the TD measurement (F = 8.71, p = 0.001) became significantly lower in G1 then in
G2. Birds in G1 showed morphological disadvantages (shorter heads and less developed limbs)
as a possible result of limited physical and cognitive exercise in simple artificial environment. Our
results suggest that intensive rearing does not contribute to relevant morphological disadvantages
within 70 DPH. Accordingly, birds for restocking or reintroduction should be translocated
within this time limit into enriched and wild-like environment where they can exercise before the
release into the wild. A first figure of morphological measurements for Apennine Rock partridge
is reported.

(Forestry Ideas, 2019, Vol. 25, No. 2) [Download]
Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-19