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Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-14
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COMPOSITIONAL ASPECTS OF THE TREES AND BUSH
VEGETATION IN THE “ALBENA” RESORT

Veselin Rangelov*, Vladimir Shtilianov, Emil Galev,
and Plamen Aleksandrov

Faculty of Ecology and Landscape Architecture, University of Forestry, 10 Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia, Bulgaria. *E-mail: veskorangelov@abv.bg

Abstract:

The trees&bush vegetation in the “Albena” resort can be viewed in two main groups, namely: I. Main plant capacities: local plant volumes; scaffolds-forming plant volumes; II. Secondary plant capacities: landscaping of the surrounding area of the buildings according to individual projects; plant collections and exhibitions. This analysis defi nes relationships and outlines guidance for the future development of the complex. The work is clarifying the structural connections between different types of plantation, the particular public parts of the complex and their functional capacity.

(Forestry Ideas, 2012, Vol. 18, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 592

CONCEPTION FOR COMPOSITIONAL AND SPATIAL
RESTRUCTURING OF THE “ALBENA” RESORT

Vladimir Shtilianov*, Veselin Rangelov, Plamen Aleksandrov,
and Emil Galev

Faculty of Ecology and Landscape Architecture, University of Forestry,
10 Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia, Bulgaria. *E-mail: vladimirsht@abv.bg

Abstract:

The proposed concept is a result of a two-year study of the components that have a direct impact on the optimal functioning of the resort. Object of the study were the following main components: spaces activity, isochron accessibility, functional zoning, scheme of mobile and pedestrian communications, structure of plant volumes. The aim of the study is to overcome some disparities connected with the existing commercial activities, administrative and municipal services, particularly as regards the methodology of selecting the site and offering of attractions. Certain basic and secondary plant volumes, which form the spatial skeleton of the complex and contribute to its harmonious integration into the surrounding landscape, are defined. Parameters are referred to for further improvement of the green system in the territory. The maintenance and development of this trend will set the resort of “Albena” as an area with high ecological factor. The concept includes ideas for reconstruction of: continuation of the axis from the main entrance of the complex as an organized attraction area; promenade with a proposal for a centrally situated park space in the middle of it; “Air lane” over the proposed park space for a link between the beach and the upper part of the complex; walking trails with viewing sites located on the same part. The established regularities and the proposed solutions contribute to the achievement of a modern and appropriate spatial structure of the complex with an improved combination of the social environmental factors with the existing natural landscape elements.

(Forestry Ideas, 2012, Vol. 18, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 718

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST VEGETATION
ON THE SOUTH SLOPE OF VITOSHA MOUNTAIN,
WESTERN BULGARIA

Nikolay Dyakov

Department of Dendrology, University of Forestry, 10 Kliment Ohridski, blvd., 1756 Sofia, Bulgaria. E-mail: ndiakov@yahoo.com

Abstract:

In the last decades numerous studies have presented vegetation classifications. Some of them highly subjective, relying entirely on qualitative data, others more objective, based on quantitative information, susceptible to statistical tests. On that ground, vegetation organization was viewed either as composed of recognizable community units or as a continuum with gradually changing composition, provoking continuous debate. This study represents numerical classification of forest vegetation on the south slope of Vitosha Mountain, Western Bulgaria. We hypothesized that described community types will not hold the statistical test for their consistence. Stratified sampling procedure and nested 0.1 ha sampling plots were used. Obtained field samples were classified with TWINSPAN clustering method. Resulting groups were tested for statistical difference for the most important environmental gradients and vegetation variables. 114 field samples were collected and grouped in nine forest community types. Six of them are dominated by Fagus sylvatica L. Two are coniferous forests (plantations), where Pinus nigra Arn. and Pinus sylvestris L. are most abundant. The last one is mixed oak forest. Beech forests predominate at higher elevation, in more mesic habitats and on steeper slopes. Most of the beech communities have significantly higher canopy closure and lower shrub and herb strata cover. Mixed oak forest and coniferous communities are richest in almost all life and growth forms. They are more susceptible to invasion, because of their proximity to populated areas and severe disturbance regime, therefore richer on alien species. Mixed oak forest and coniferous communities also have significantly higher species richness per 0.1 ha and 1 m2, as well as higher alpha diversity and evenness. All forest communities in the studied region are poor in rare, protected and endemic species. Despite the significant differences between some of the Fagus sylvatica communities and the mixed forests, they are generally unrecognizable statistically from each other. Therefore, the vegetation of the studied area is considered as having continuum organization. Numerical classification, relying on quantitative and statistically testable data, will objectify and simplify vegetation understanding and improve future management activities.

(Forestry Ideas, 2012, Vol. 18, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 724

NEST PREDATION OF CHUKAR PARTRIDGE
(ALECTORIS CHUKAR GRAY, 1830) IN SOUTHEASTERN
BULGARIA: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Gradimir Gruychev

Department of Wildlife Management, Faculty of Forestry, University of Forestry, 10 Kliment Ohridski Blvd. 1756 Sofia, Bulgaria. E-mail: gradi.val@gmail.com

Abstract:

This study aims investigation of chukar partridge losses during the incubation period in species’ nesting habitat. From 45 nests set in 2010 and 2011, 19 (42.22 %) were destroyed. In 13 of these, mammal predation was the cause. 4 (8.89 %) were destroyed by birds and 2 (4.44 %) by unknown pest. Statistical differences between the size of destroyed nests and herb vegetation height have not been found. Losses were, more likely, distributed randomly in time. Relationship between setting time and herb vegetation height was not established.

(Forestry Ideas, 2012, Vol. 18, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 885

APPROPRIATE TREE SPECIES FOR INTENSIVE FOREST
PLANTATIONS IN CENTRAL NORTHERN BULGARIA

Kancho Kalmukov

Experimental Station for Fast-growing Forest Species, 18 Nove str., Svishtov, Bulgaria. E-mail: kkalmukov@abv.bg

Abstract:

The ever-growing demand for timber and restricted harvesting in oak and beech forests resulted in the idea of establishment of fast-growing forest tree plantations. The present paper presents results of a study on the plantations established in 1984 and 1985 in State Forest Service (SFS) Gorna Oryahovitsa, near the village Paisiy. The experiment consisted of pure plantations of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, Cedrus atlantica Manetti, Quercus rubra L., Tilia tomentosa Moench., Robinia pseudoacacia L. and Pinus nigra Arn., and mixed plantations of Cedrus atlantica, Quercus rubra and Tilia tomentosa. All species were planted in three different locations. Robinia pseudoacacia plantations with initial density 2 х 1 m, and natural Quercus cerris Q. frainetto stand were used as control. The intensive plantations were more productive than both conventional stands and natural forest. At the age of 20 to 21 the target species were in good health, grew well, and did not show any signs of deteriorating health. Highest increment was recorded in the pure plantations of Tilia tomentosa, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Pinus nigra. The research proved that intensive forest plantations are especially suitable for the lower forest belt if they are planted on suitable locations and the soil is appropriately cultivated.

(Forestry Ideas, 2012, Vol. 18, No. 1) [Download]
Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-14