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Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-14
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EFFECT OF SULPHURIC ACID SCARIFICATION, COLD MOIST STRATIFICATION AND GIBBERELLIC ACID ON GERMINATION OF PALIURUS SPINA-CHRISTI MILL. SEEDS

Elias Pipinis1*, Elias Milios2, and Pavlos Smiris1

1Laboratory of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry and Natural Environment, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece. *E-mail: epipinis@for.auth.gr
2Department of Forestry and Management of the Environment and Natural Resources, Democritus University of Thrace, Pandazidou 193, 68200 Orestiada, Greece.

Abstract:

Paliurus spina-christi seeds were subjected to several treatments in order to overcome dormancy and to maximize germination. Seeds were subjected to sulphuric acid scarification for 0, 30, 60 and 90 minutes and then were stratified at 3–5 °C for 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks (1st experiment) or treated with 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm gibberellic acid (2nd experiment). In the first experiment, increasing scarification of non-stratified seeds from 30 to 60 or 90 minutes germination percentage increased significantly. Moreover, cold stratification treatments of non-scarified seeds resulted in very low germination percentages. The combination of acid scarification and cold stratification treatments improved significantly germination percentages. In the second experiment, treatment with gibberellic acid, regardless of concentration, of scarified seeds improved significantly germination percentages. The concentration of gibberellic acid was found to effect germination only in 30 minutes scarified seeds. In treated seeds with 500 or 1000 ppm gibberellic acid, a significant increase of germination percentage together with the increase of time of scarification from 30 to 60 or 90 minutes was observed. The results revealed that scarification was more effective than cold stratification in improving seed germination when treatments were applied alone. The highest germination percentages were observed when acid scarification was followed by cold stratification or treatment with gibberellic acid.

(Forestry Ideas, 2011, Vol. 17, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 1539

SURVEY OF THE LONGHORNED BEETLE SPECIES (COLEOPTERA: CERAMBYCIDAE) ON ACACIA SENEGAL L. (WILD) IN KORDOFAN REGION, SUDAN

Maymoona Ahmed Eisa1, Yasir Gasmelssed A. Bashir2, and Gianfranco Sama3

1Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Forest Botany and Forest Zoology, Germany. E-mail: maymoonaeisa@yahoo.com
2Agricultural Research Corporation, Wad Medani P. O. Box 126, Sudan. www.arcsudan.sd. Prof. Yasir Gasm Elsseed A. Bashir. Director, Crop Protection Research Centre. E-mail: yasir_bashir@hotmail.com
3Vi Raffaello Sanzio, 84, I 47521, Cesena, Italy. E-mail: g.sama@cesena.nettuno.it

Abstract:

Acacia senegal, the gum Arabic producing tree, is of great economic importance in Sudan. Serious biotic and abiotic factors are threatening its growth and production. Among these, the long-horned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are the most deleterious insect pests resulting in complete death of Acacia trees. This study was conducted in northern Kordofan state Sudan season 2007/2008 with aims to identify spectrum, relative abundance and phenology of long-horned beetle species acting as pests of A. senegal tree. Moreover, the study focuses on the assessment of tree characteristics triggering the infestation. The species spectrum and their relative abundance were determined by catch results of flight interception traps, microclimatic conditions were assessed using data loggers, tree characteristics were done by direct measurements in addition, and a questionnaire was designed to assess farmers' knowledge on long-horned beetles. The results indicated that seven species of the long-horned beetles were recorded from the flight interception traps on the study sites. The recorded species were Anthracocentrus arabicus (Thomson 1877), Crossotus subocellatus subocellatus (Fairmaire 1886) (Eisa et al. 2008), Crossotus strgifrons (Fairmaire 1886) Doesus telephoroides (Pascoe, 1862), Titoceres Jaspideus (Serville 1835) (Eisa et al. 2008), Tithoes sp. and Gasponia gaurani (Fairmaire 1892). The highest percentage of infestation (100 %) was recorded in El Demokeya site with an average tree age of 43 years, followed by on Acacia agricultural project site (23.5 %) with an average tree age of 10 years and on Elhemaira site (20 %).

(Forestry Ideas, 2011, Vol. 17, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 1443

RECONSTRUCTION OF PHYLOGENY OF THE GENUS RHODODENDRON L. FROM RUSSIA BASEDON THE MOLECULAR GENETIC DATA

Maxim G. Kutsev1 and Anatoly V. Karakulov2

1South Siberian Botanical Garden of Altai State University, Barnaul, Russia.
2Central Siberian Botanical Garden of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 101 Zolotodolinskaya str., Novosibirsk 630090, Russia. E-mail: krk007@rambler.ru

Abstract:

As a result of the analysis performed, a genealogical network representing evolutionary relations between Rhododendron L. species was obtained. Phylogeny of Rhododendron species reconstructed on the basis of ITS1-ITS2 sequence corresponds to anatomical-morphological classification of D. Chamberlain (1996).

(Forestry Ideas, 2011, Vol. 17, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 1459

TREE RING AND ANATOMICAL STUDIES IN PINUS HELDREICHII FORESTS IN PIRIN MOUNTAINS, BULGARIA

Momchil Panayotov1,2, Evgeni Tsavkov1, Petar Zhelev1, Stefan Yurukov1, Albena Ivanova1, Maria Russeva1, Yanitsa Todorova1, and Valerie Trouet3

1University of Forestry, Sofia, Bulgaria. E-mail: mp2@abv.bg
2WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF, Davos, Switzerland.
3WSL Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.

Abstract:

Pinus heldreichii forests in pristine condition can still be found in Pirin National Park in Bulgaria. Although they are of high conservational value still numerous questions for their structure, the physiological and genetic peculiarities of the species exist. Here we present results for several tree ring chronologies constructed along altitudinal gradient and different exposures. We also studied the variation of anatomical leaf parameters like number of resin ducts and stomata. We found that the oldest trees in the valley reach 800 years and are situated on isolated by rock bands sites close to the local treeline. Forests on the slopes at the bottom of the valley are 200–300 years old with single older trees. Many of them are probably shaped by fires in the past. We found similar variability in tree ring chronologies from different exposures. Only one chronology constructed from a mixed coniferous forest was found to differ at certain periods from the other chronologies. The most probable reason for this is exogenous disturbance like a fire. We did not find enough evidence that the anatomical traits of the needles are altitude dependent, although number of resin ducts and the number of stomata on the outer surface were found to increase with altitude.

(Forestry Ideas, 2011, Vol. 17, No. 1) [Download]
Downloads: 690

VARIABILITY IN MAGNESIUM CONCETRATION IN NEEDLES OF DIFFERENT DOUGLAS-FIR PROVENANCES

Vera Lavadinović1, Zoran Miletić1, Vukan Lavadinović2, and Vasilije Isajev2

1Institute of Forestry, Belgraded, Kneza Višeslava 3, Serbia.E-mail: veralava@eunet.rs 2Faculty of Forestry, Belgrad, Kneza Višeslava 1, Serbia.

Abstract:

Magnesium concentration in the needles of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga mensiesii /Mirb./ Franco) was investigated in a provenance test under homogeneous site conditions (Ass. Fagetum submontanum Rud. on acid brown soil on gneiss). The established quantities of magnesium in needles are indicative for different capabilities of certain Douglas-fir provenances to adopt this nutritive element from the soil. Significant differences among the examined provenances were found in mean height, mean diameter, tree volume and basal area. However, regression analysis revealed that there is no significant relation between magnesium concentration in needles of different Douglas-fir provenances and any of the examined forest stand parameters. Differences in mean height, mean diameter, tree volume and basal area are not the consequence of different capability of certain Douglas-fir provenances to adopt magnesium from the soil but are of genetic nature.

(Forestry Ideas, 2011, Vol. 17, No. 1) [Download]
Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-14