Issues


Issues: 1-5 | 6-9
Downloads: 101

DIETARY COMPOSITION OF EURASIAN OTTER (LUTRA
LUTRA LINNAEUS, 1758) IN THE EASTERN RHODOPE
MOUNTAINS (BULGARIA)

Yanislav Yanchev (1), Teodora Teofilova (2)*, Yanaki Sivkov (3),

and Nikolay Kodzhabashev (4)

1. Forestry University, Faculty of Ecology and Landscape Architecture, Department of Ecology,
10 St. Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1797 Sofia, Bulgaria. E-mail: ianislav_ianchev@hotmail.com
2. Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research (IBER), Bulgarian Academy of Sciences,
1 Tsar Osvoboditel Blvd., 1000 Sofia, Bulgaria. *E-mail: oberon_zoo@abv.bg
3. Museum of Natural History, 41 Maria Louisa Blvd., 9000 Varna, Bulgaria.
4. Forestry University, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Hunting and Game Management,
10 St. Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1797 Sofia, Bulgaria. E-mail: ndkodjak@abv.bg

Abstract:

Eurasian otter as a specialised carnivore on hydrobionts is often a subject of speculative
believes from fishermen and fishery farmers. Dietary analysis of this species was performed by
remnants of bones, scales, feathers and other undigestible components in the faeces. Collected
in the Eastern Rhodope Mts. otter spraints showed the species composition, weight, percentage,
and size and age composition of the preyed animals (mostly fishes). Food preferences of otter
populations in the area and the importance of this species for the hydrobionts were analysed and
evaluated. Otter’s ecological plasticity was examined with regard to nutrition, in dependence on
habitat’s type and available food base. We found that the most preferred fish preys are with medium
body size 10–12 cm and weight 80–90 g. The main fish species in the studied area are the
chub, barbel and nase, and additional are the bleak, perch, roach, silver carp, bitterling, sunfish
and ruffe.

(Forestry Ideas, 2017, Vol. 23, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 88

CONSUMER’S PREFERENCES AND FACTORS
AFFECTING THE URBAN DEMAND FOR BAOBAB
(ADANSONIA DIGITATA L.) FRUITS IN SUDAN

Yahia Omar Adam

University of Khartoum, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Management, Code 13314
Shambat-Sudan. E-mail: gumaa1973@hotmail.com

Abstract:

The objective of the study was to recognize the baobab fruit consumers’ preferences and factors
affecting the urban demand. For this purpose, data was collected in 2015 from 100 and 150
fruit consumers in Elobeid and Khartoum markets, respectively, using structured questionnaire.
Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentages) were used for data analysis. The study results
reveal that there is demand for the baobab fruit and its secondary products, and thus substantial
fruit pulp commercialization exists in Sudan. The most important attraction factor for the consumer
is the nutritional value (vitamins) of the fruit pulp. The study suggests a need for promoting
fruits processing, and this could further create a desire for domesticating and managing baobab
trees in private farms and rural livelihoods improvement.

(Forestry Ideas, 2017, Vol. 23, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 99

NATURAL REGENERATION UNDER PINE STANDS
IN FRESH PINE FORESTS OF ZHYTOMYR POLISSYA
AREA (UKRAINE)

Yuri V. Siruk (1)*, Vasil M. Turko (1), and Yevhen P. Pechenjuk (2)

1. School of Forestry, Zhytomyr National Agroecological University, 7, Stary Blvd., Zhytomyr city,
10008, Ukraine. *E-mail: Qarpofor@gmail.com
2. Malyn Forestry College, Zhytomyr district, v. Hamarna, 11643, Ukraine

Abstract:

Under unfavourable ecological and climatic factors pine plantations preserve the seeding abilities
on forest plots. Provision of soil moisture (that directly depends on regular precipitations)
during vegetative period is decisive for the appearance and preservation of young generation.
Successful natural regeneration of more than ¾th of area is possible due to the pine undergrowth
of even less than 10-year-old trees, accounting their vitality.

(Forestry Ideas, 2017, Vol. 23, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 97

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOREST ABOVEGROUND
BIOMASS GROWTH AND TREE SPECIES RICHNESS,
IDENTITY, AND STRUCTURE

Santosh Ojha and Luben Dimov*

Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Alabama A&M University, Normal AL
35762, USA. E-mails: santoshdfrs@gmail.com, Luben.Dimov@gmail.com

Abstract:

The effects of stand structure and species composition on the forest diversity-productivity
relationship have received much attention during the last few decades. The objective of this study
was to compare dry live aboveground biomass (AGB) growth among species structures (pure
hardwood, mixtures of hardwoods, mixtures of pines, mixtures of pines with hardwoods, and pure
pine) for different stand age, stand stocking, and site productivity classes. We also examined the
relationship between AGB growth and the predictors species richness, quadratic mean diameter,
height, compacted crown ratio, relative density, slope, aspect, precipitation, and elevation. We
used data from 2554 USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots in Alabama. Tukey-Kramer
procedure with multiplicity adjustment was applied to compare AGB growth among the five species
structures. Species richness was 1–17 and AGB growth was 0.01–15.68 Mg ha-1 yr-1 across
the plots. For the pooled data, there was a weak overall correlation between AGB growth and
species richness (r=0.07, p=0.001). The AGB growth of pure and mixed stands was statistically
the same. In high-stocked stands productivity (AGB growth) was statistically the same in the
different structures. There was no difference between the AGB growth rate of pure pine stands
and mixtures that contained pine. However, pure pine stands outperformed mixed stands that
did not contain pines in the mix. Species identity was an important factor for AGB growth in pure
and mixed stands. As stocking increased, species structure became less important for the AGB
growth rate. Among stands with high-stocking, pure stands were as productive as mixtures with
no overall growth benefit of monocultures. If high or medium stocking level is maintained, there is
no obvious growth benefit from monocultures or mixtures. In stands with low-stocking however,
there appeared to be a benefit to having multiple species in the composition.

(Forestry Ideas, 2017, Vol. 23, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 88

PLANTS FOR LIVER AND JAUNDICE TREATMENT: A CASE STUDY
FROM FOREST FRINGE COMMUNITIES IN NORTH BENGAL, INDIA

Saroj Biswakarma, Nazir A. Pala*, Gopal Shukla, Vineeta,
and Sumit Chakravarty

Department of Forestry, Uttar Banga KrishiViswavidyalaya, Cooch Behar, West Bengal, India.
E-mail: c_drsumit@yahoo.com

Abstract:

The traditional utilization of ethno-medicinal plants used for the treatment of jaundice and
other liver disorder is commonly known among ethnic groups. The present study was carried out
among the forest fringe villages of Chilapatta Reserve Forest in foothills of the eastern Sub-Himalayan
mountain belts of West Bengal. The aim of the study was to document the traditionally
used ethno-medicinal plant resources against jaundice and other liver disorders. A total of 19
plant species belonging to 15 families and 17 genera were documented. These 19 species were
dominated by trees (07), herbs (05), shrubs (03) and four species of climbers. The plant families
dominating the list were Apiaceae, Dioscoreaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Moraceae with 2 species
each. Fruits (08) were the most dominant plant parts used for the treatment followed by leaves
of 07 species. The plant parts are employed by the inhabitants in the form of infusion, decoction,
paste, juice, etc., either as a sole drug species or in combination with other species. The documented
plants and their procedure for utilization can be a useful tool for scientific community for
further evaluation and recommendations to the practicing communities.

(Forestry Ideas, 2017, Vol. 23, No. 2) [Download]
Issues: 1-5 | 6-9