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Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-12
Downloads: 696

OVERVIEW OF GENETIC DIVERSITY OF BROWN HARE (LEPUS EUROPAEUS PALLAS) FROM BULGARIA
 

Chavdar Zhelev and Nino Ninov 

Department of Wildlife management, University of Forestry, 10 Kliment Ohridski blvd., 1797 Sofia, Bulgaria. 

Abstract:

There are so far several studies on the level of genetic diversity and differentiation of the brown hare populations in Bulgaria. Since the information available is not summarized the aim of this review was to summarize previous knowledge on genetic diversity of the brown hares from Bulgaria in order to disclose new horizons and directions for future genetic studies. We did a review of 10 publications on the brown hare genetic diversity, mostly in Bulgaria but also in other adjacent regions, where the brown hare was introduced or naturally presented. The results from allozymic, RAPD and microsatellite markers show that the genetic diversity is the highest in the Anatolian populations, followed by the Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian and finally by the Austrian ones. A fragmentation on a small geographical scale can be seen, illustrated by the presence of regional rare alleles, appearing with a low frequency. Gene flow is present across long geographical distances. There was no negative impact on the genetic diversity, caused by decreasing of population size for long periods of time. 

(Forestry Ideas, 2014, Vol. 20, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 542

SOIL TEXTURE CHANGES IN GRAY FOREST SOILS (GRAY LUVISOLS) INFLUENCED BY FOREST FIRES IN DECIDUOUS FORESTS
 

Simeon Bogdanov 

University of Forestry, 10 Kliment Ohridski Bld., 1756 Sofia, Bulgaria.

Abstract:

The paper presents results from investigation on soil texture changes caused by forest fires in the Northwestern region of Bulgaria. Gray Forest soils (Gray Luvisols, FAO 1990) influenced by strong surface fire and weak surface fire have been investigated. The sample plots are set up in burned and unburned control areas. They are correspondingly situated in the Lower forest vegetation zone (0–600 m a.s.l.) of the Moesian forest vegetation area. Soil samples have been taken three times for five years in order to investigate the dynamics of the changes. The fractions of sand, silt and clay have been determined by pipette method. A relation was established between soil texture changes and intensity of fires. 

(Forestry Ideas, 2014, Vol. 20, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 2190

HONEY FORESTS AS AN EXAMPLE OF AGROFORESTRY PRACTICES IN TURKEY
 

Sezgin Ayan(1), Özlem Ayan(2), Tayyibe Altunel(3), and Esra Nurten Yer(1) 

1. Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, Kastamonu University, Kuzeykent, Turkey. *E-mail: sezginayan@gmail.com
2. Sub-Directorate of Non-Wood Forest Products, Kastamonu Forestry Regional Directorate, Turkey.
3. Department of Forest Economics, Faculty of Forestry, Kastamonu University, Kuzeykent, Turkey.
 

Abstract:

Forest villagers are one of the poorest people in Turkey. Almost 7,8 million people live in forest villages. That’s why agroforestry is very strategic tool for supporting this people. In recent years, General Directorate of Forestry in Turkey has given very much importance to establish “Honey Forest”. For this reason, various trees and shrubs are used in different regions. The objective of this paper is to present information about convenient species for establishing “Honey Forest” in different regions and as a special honey production in the natural Pinus brutia forests in the Mediterranean forests of Turkey. Moreover, one fourth of all the honey produced in Turkey is directly from pines, especially from Forestry Regional Directorate of Mugla. Having about 5 million beehive and approx. 80,000–90,000 tons of honey production, Turkey is an important country for honey production. However, the 16–17 kg production for each beehive is lower than the world average (20–22 kg/beehive). As a result, all agroforestry systems in Turkey need scientific support, institutional financing and legal arrangements to stimulate the increase of production. Promotion of agroforestry in Turkey will help the country to solve various problems, such as environmental degradation, lack of food security, and deforestation.

(Forestry Ideas, 2014, Vol. 20, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 613

IMPROVEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTE AND RESIDUES USE THROUGH BIOGAS PRODUCTION
 

Anna Aladjadjiyan(1), Nikolay Kakanakov(2), and Aleksandar Zahariev(2) 

1. Agricultural University, 12, Mendeleev Str., 4000 Plovdiv, Bulgaria. E-mail: anna@au-plovdiv.bg
2. National Biomass Association, 22, Antim Parvi Str., 4000 Plovdiv, Bulgaria. E-mail: animal_bg@abv.bg
 

Abstract:

Processing residues from agriculture for energy production or exploitation of useful materials allows reconnection of crop production and animal husbandry. It becomes also a prerequisite for achieving sustainable agriculture. One of the most common technologies is the anaerobic digestion of plant and animal residues and wastes (manure, straw). As a result of the process, biogas (methane up to 80 %) is produced. This could be used further as fuel for transportation and heating, and in availability of a generator also for electricity production. The fermentation residues are biomass containing essential elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, and could be used further as fertilizer. 

(Forestry Ideas, 2014, Vol. 20, No. 2) [Download]
Downloads: 1031

EFFECTS OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION ON BIODIVERSITY AND COMPOSITION OF HERBACEOUS SPECIES COVER, ASALEM FOREST, NORTHERN IRAN
 

Hajar Tarvirdizadeh*, Mehrdad Nikooy, Hassan Pourbabaei, and Ramin Naghdi 

Department of Forestry, Natural Resources Faculty, University of Guilan, Someh sara, P. O. Box 1144, Guilan, Iran.  *E−mail: tarvirdi.1368@gmail.com
 

Abstract:

We assessed a forest road impact on the diversity and the composition of herbaceous plant communities in the forest road margins, referring to illuminance and soil moisture percentage, to understand which of them is more important after more than 50 years from the building of the road. For this purpose six transects of approximately one kilometer length parallel to the forest road were established. Along each transect, 15 square sample plots of 1m2 each were chosen by systematic random sampling. The average cover of herbaceous species on the cut and fill slopes was significantly higher than that inside the forest and that of the roadsides. There wasn’t a significant correlation between biodiversity indicators and illuminance and soil moisture percentage. Entering invasive species altered the composition of the herbaceous cover and increased the richness of species on cut and fill slopes. Roadside plots under completely closed canopies of edge trees since the road has been built, have returned to original composition of the forest vegetation, showing contents similar to that of the forest plots. 

(Forestry Ideas, 2014, Vol. 20, No. 2) [Download]
Issues: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-12